Friday, September 10, 2010

WARNING- foul language

this is ridiculous.... i have added my 2 cents at the bottom
 
 
GAINESVILLE, Fla. – As thousands of Afghans protested a tiny Florida church's plan to burn the Muslim holy book, the church's pastor said he won't follow through with the burning if he's able to meet Saturday with the organizers behind a mosque planned near ground zero in New York.
In Afghanistan, at least 11 people were injured Friday in protests.
Police in the northern province of Badakhshan said several hundred demonstrators ran toward a NATO compound where four attackers and five police were injured in clashes. Protesters also burned an American flag at a mosque after Friday prayers. In western Farah province, police said two people were injured in another protest.
Speaking to NBC's "Today" show, the Rev. Terry Jones said if he meets with the imam in New York, he won't burn the Quran. It wasn't clear if he meant the burning would be halted indefinitely or just for Saturday.
Imam Muhammad Musri, the president of the Islamic Society of Central Florida, told CBS' "The Early Show" he had a commitment for Jones and himself to meet in New York with the imam there.
City officials in Gainesville said Friday that no matter what Jones says he'll do, they planned to stick with their plan to increase security in response to the event.
Earlier, Jones and Musri had disagreed sharply on the terms of their agreement.
Jones said Thursday he would call off the planned burning of Qurans based on a deal negotiated with Musri that the location of a mosque planned near ground zero in New York would be changed.
But Musri said he was clear on Thursday when he told Jones that he could only set up a meeting with planners of the New York City mosque. Jones responded by suggesting that he would go forward with his plan on Saturday after all.
"We are just really shocked," Jones said of Musri. "He clearly, clearly lied to us."
Video courtesy of ABC News. For more visit ABC News.com

For U.S. political leaders and Muslims around the world who have been outraged by Jones' antics, the on-again, off-again threat bred even more frustration.
Cleric Rusli Hasbi told 1,000 worshippers attending Friday morning prayers in Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim country, that whether or not he burns the Quran, Jones had already "hurt the heart of the Muslim world."
"If he'd gone through with it, it would have been tantamount to war," the cleric said in the coastal town of Lhokseumawe. "A war that would have rallied Muslims all over the world."
Muslims consider the book the sacred word of God and insist it be treated with the utmost respect.
In Afghanistan, where tens of thousands of U.S. troops are in harm's way, President Hamid Karzai said he heard Jones had perhaps abandoned his Quran-burning plan.
"The holy book is implanted in the hearts and minds of all the Muslims," Karzai said. "Humiliation of the holy book represents the humiliation of our people. I hope that this decision will be stopped and should never have been considered."
Previously, Jones had not invoked the mosque controversy as a reason for his planned protest at his Dove World Outreach Center. Instead, he cited his belief that the Quran is evil because it espouses something other than biblical truth and incites radical, violent behavior among Muslims.
Opponents of the New York City mosque argue it is insensitive to families and memories of Sept. 11 victims to build a mosque so close to where Islamic extremists flew planes into the World Trade Center and killed nearly 2,800 people. Proponents say the project reflects religious freedom and diversity and that hatred of Muslims is fueling the opposition.
President Barack Obama urged Jones to listen to "those better angels," saying that besides endangering lives, it would give Islamic terrorists a recruiting tool. Defense Secretary Robert Gates took the extraordinary step of calling Jones personally.
Outside London's Central Mosque across from Regent's Park, worshippers chatted, fed geese or posed for pictures Friday by the children's boating pond. Those interviewed about the threatened Quran burning seemed more upset by the media coverage of it than the threat itself.
Medhat Singab, a 47-year-old Egyptian-born Briton, said the media was making a circus of "a church with 30 followers and an idiot."
"They can go on burning the Quran," he said, "It's not going to destroy Islam."
Jamal Ali, 17, said he was talking about the issue with his friends on his way to the mosque. The Sudanese-born student said he thought rowdy protests weren't the right reaction.
Iraq's top Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani said the intent to burn copies of the Quran is Jones' "expression of hatred of Islam" but called on Muslims to restrain their reactions and not offend Christians in any way.
"This disgraceful act contradicts the very duties of religious and spiritual leadership to enhance the value of peaceful coexistence and safeguard the rights and mutual respect among religions," al-Sistani said in a statement posted on his website Friday.
Jones' church, which has about 50 members, is independent of any denomination. It follows the Pentecostal tradition, which teaches that the Holy Spirit can manifest itself in the modern day.
News of the possible cancellation also was welcomed by Jones' neighbors in Gainesville, a city of 125,000 anchored by the sprawling University of Florida campus. At least two dozen Christian churches, Jewish temples and Muslim organizations in the city had mobilized to plan inclusive events, including Quran readings at services, as a counterpoint to Jones' protest.
Jones said at the news conference that he prayed about the decision and concluded that if the mosque was moved, it would be a sign from God to call off the Quran burning.
Part of the pressure exerted on Jones came from Gates who briefly spoke to the pastor before his first announcement to call it off. Gates expressed "his grave concern that going forward with this Quran burning would put the lives of our forces at risk, especially in Iraq and Afghanistan," Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell said.





ok so, some religious nut in asswater florida thinks that holding the quaran hostage is going to make some kinda statement? it makes a statement alright. it says "im an ignorant, intolerant asshole".
how do his actions differ from a terrorist? next he will be taking actual Muslims hostage.  this is deranged, and dangerous, and is only seeking attention. this WILL NOT STOP the mosque in NYC. this WILL NOT STOP terror at home and abroad. all this is going to do, is create even more of a wedge between Christian and Muslim people, in an already tense world.

YOU ARE NO BETTER THAN THE TERRORISTS, YOU DUMB MOTHERFUCKER.
this is why religion needs to be stopped. all religion ever accomplishes, is world wars, propaganda, and hatred.
fuck religion, fuck your book burning crapola, and FUCK YOU

wake up and smell the 21'st fucking century

14 comments:

  1. I agree with pretty much everything you've said. The pastor is a douchebag. However, watching Obama's press conference, he was just asked about the Mosque and the Koran burning and he said in regards to the burning that "he's just going out of his way to be provocative" which is EXACTLY what the Imam for that mosque is doing. Then he said "if someone wants to build a mosque, build a mosque", and that's pretty much when I say "and if someone wants to burn a book, they can burn a book."

    While I think burning the Koran WILL endanger the troops overseas, and while I disagree with it being burned, I am so SICK of our country living in double standards. Those who do not practice the muslim faith here in American simply cannot be offended by a mosque, but practitioners of Muslim faith can be offended by the burning of the Koran.

    I was a supporter of Obama, but I'm quickly taking back any support I had for him. He just blatantly issued a double-standard, saying that everyone was created equal and that everyone had the same rights, yet some ass can put a mosque a couple blocks [with a view] from ground zero, but some asshole can't burn a book.

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  2. yeah its pretty fucked up. what a serious insult to the entire of new york, that mosque is.. if they want to build one fine.. but build it someplace else. its seriously disrespectful to put it THERE.
    if its NOT meant to be a deliberate insult to the american people, they wont mind moving it elsewhere

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  3. The planned location of the mosque is in poor taste, to say the least. And it is an issue that is worthy of media attention. The book burning is not. This would not be an issue were it not for the irresponsible media. Had the media not made such a spectacle of this thing, no one would be endangered by it. Yes, I know, the public has a right to know... blah, blah, blah. But frankly, in this case, the only people who even give a shit are the people that are going to be pissed off about it. So all they have managed to accomplish is to create a big shit-stir, and to give some blow-hard his fifteen minutes of undeserved fame.
    Had his little plan been ignored, he probably would not even have gone through with it. And if he had, well, so what?

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  4. I greatly dislike book burners of any sort, no matter for what reason. I am not going so far as to say he CAN'T burn it, because Constitutionally he has every right to do so, but he shouldn't. There are alright violent riots and protests concerning this and it hasn't even taken place, yet! But taffy, you are right, but the media reports this type of thing because it sells them advertising but also because most people would care. We're talking about it now, aren't we?

    As for the mosque, well, we'll agree to disagree. Muslims who love this country as much as you and I also died during those attacks. The primary function would be a community center (think something like your local Jewish community center) with the prayer space upstairs and out of the way. Saying someone is forbidden from celebrating their faith ANYWHERE in this country on their own property is pretty unAmerican, I believe. It's only a slap in the face for those who cannot comprehend that the Muslim culture is as varied as the Christian culture, or the Western culture, or any culture with a very large number of people spread all over the world. Honestly, if you believe the mosque is wrong, you're not much different than the Pastor who wants to burn the Quran. Not all Muslims are evil like the terrorists on 9/11. One would be terribly short-sighted and more than a bit bigoted if they he or she thought so.

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  5. I believe it's more a matter that a Mosque RIGHT THERE is in poor taste. Yes there are people from many parts of the world that inhabit NYC, however, when terrorists attack the World Trade Center and then years later, to put a Mosque there is only going to anger a lot of people, and why shouldn't it? It was devastating.

    The mosque isn't wrong, religion isn't wrong, it's the damn fools who can't see past their own prejudice and looking out for themselves that is wrong with this world. We can all live peacefully with each other if we were open minded.

    That being said, I DO think it is insensitive of them to place a Mosque there. The best thing that should be put there is a memorial.

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  6. LE the Mosque would be 2 blocks from Ground Zero. There will be a memorial on the actual site. I think that is where a lot of the confusion is coming from. People who would rather you not learn for yourself what the actual issue is make it SOUND like it's right on top of the former WTC.

    And I will add I understand a lot of the negative opinions are from people who are very emotionally charged by it, and it being so close to the anniversary just amplifies that. Maybe I was a bit harsh about the "bigot" comment but I will say those who love the Constitution, love America, and who take a moment to breathe and think clearly, they may change their mind.

    Think of it this way:

    Say my family was murdered by a group of severely racist black people. They burned down my house and did everything they could to wreck havoc in the neighborhood. Would you then forbid another black family, who have nothing to do with the group of radicals, to move into a house 2 blocks away, or even across the street?

    Put in those terms it seems a little silly and distasteful. Not all Muslims are terrorists, like not all blacks are gang members.

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  7. a black family moving in, no. a great big 'black power' center WOULD be offensive. there is no reason why they cant have their religeous building, they should just respect the sensitivities of the american people, and put it SOMEPLACE ELSE. its rude, insensitive, and quite frankly, arrogant. i have no issue with muslim people, or the religion in general. (its always the extremists in ANY religion who create problems)
    its the fact that they refuse to acknowledge ANY of the peoples whos friends and relatives DIED that day, have any rights or sensitivities regarding the location. They show no respect. and in my book respect is a two way street. you want to get it, you need to give it first.

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  8. But this isn't the equivalent of a "black power" building. It's community center open for everyone.

    What about the respect for the American Muslims who died that day? For the many American Muslims who love this country? How is building a center, open to the community of all faiths and creeds, insensitive?

    In fact, the person who currently owns one of the buildings and it leasing the other, Hisham Elzanaty, is a victim of terrorist attack! His parents were on a plane that was forcibly steered into the ocean in 1999 by a rogue co-pilot.

    Forcing this center to be moved only proves to those on the fence that Islam is under attack in America. It gives terrorist groups more fodder in their mission to prove that we, as American, hate all Muslims, for we are even going against those who have done no wrong, and do not intent to do any wrong.

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  9. if he is in fact a victim, he should understand then. the fact that he refuses to be even remotely compassionate speaks volumes about his intent.
    and then it just fuels statements like 'all americans hate muslims'. he can just throw it in the face of americans forever, cant he? 'i felt like being a douchbag and waving a big fuck you flag in the face of america, and nownthey are all anti muslim.' thats just a cheap excuse. just because you are against this mosque, does not automaticaly make you anti muslim. THAT is ignorant

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  10. We are going to have to agree to disagree, then.

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  11. I greatly dislike book burners of any sort, no matter for what reason. I am not going so far as to say he CAN'T burn it, because Constitutionally he has every right to do so, but he shouldn't. There are alright violent riots and protests concerning this and it hasn't even taken place, yet! But taffy, you are right, but the media reports this type of thing because it sells them advertising but also because most people would care. We're talking about it now, aren't we?

    As for the mosque, well, we'll agree to disagree. Muslims who love this country as much as you and I also died during those attacks. The primary function would be a community center (think something like your local Jewish community center) with the prayer space upstairs and out of the way. Saying someone is forbidden from celebrating their faith ANYWHERE in this country on their own property is pretty unAmerican, I believe. It's only a slap in the face for those who cannot comprehend that the Muslim culture is as varied as the Christian culture, or the Western culture, or any culture with a very large number of people spread all over the world. Honestly, if you believe the mosque is wrong, you're not much different than the Pastor who wants to burn the Quran. Not all Muslims are evil like the terrorists on 9/11. One would be terribly short-sighted and more than a bit bigoted if they he or she thought so.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I agree with pretty much everything you've said. The pastor is a douchebag. However, watching Obama's press conference, he was just asked about the Mosque and the Koran burning and he said in regards to the burning that "he's just going out of his way to be provocative" which is EXACTLY what the Imam for that mosque is doing. Then he said "if someone wants to build a mosque, build a mosque", and that's pretty much when I say "and if someone wants to burn a book, they can burn a book."

    While I think burning the Koran WILL endanger the troops overseas, and while I disagree with it being burned, I am so SICK of our country living in double standards. Those who do not practice the muslim faith here in American simply cannot be offended by a mosque, but practitioners of Muslim faith can be offended by the burning of the Koran.

    I was a supporter of Obama, but I'm quickly taking back any support I had for him. He just blatantly issued a double-standard, saying that everyone was created equal and that everyone had the same rights, yet some ass can put a mosque a couple blocks [with a view] from ground zero, but some asshole can't burn a book.

    ReplyDelete